TS Inter 1st Year Zoology Notes Chapter 3 Animal Diversity-I: Invertebrate Phyla

Here students can locate TS Inter 1st Year Zoology Notes 3rd Lesson Animal Diversity-I: Invertebrate Phyla to prepare for their exam.

TS Inter 1st Year Zoology Notes 3rd Lesson Animal Diversity-I: Invertebrate Phyla

→ Animalia (Metazoa) includes multi-cellular, heterotrophic, eukaryotes with specific bauplans.

→ Collagen is the abundant protein and unique to the Kingdom Animalia.

→ Most simple multi-cellular organisms are the sponges which show cellular level of organisation.

→ The diploblastic animals like cnidarians and ctenophores show tissue level of organisation. They possess ectoderm and endoderm.

→ In triploblastic animals in addition to ectoderm and endoderm a third germinal layer the mesoderm appears in between the above two layers.

→ This upgrades tissue level organisation to ‘organ’ and ‘organ system’ level of organisation.

→ The first tube within a tube body organisation arose with the evolution of the Nematoda.

→ Evolution of tissues, development of bilateral symmetny and origin of the body cavity are successively considered the first, second and the third key transitions.

→ In this unit, the entire history of evolution of organisation in the animal kingdom from simple to more complex levels is explained.

→ Animals are broadly classified into invertebrates and vertebrates.

TS Inter 1st Year Zoology Notes Chapter 3 Animal Diversity-I: Invertebrate Phyla

→ The animals which lack a notochord are called invertebrates.

→ Libbie Henrietta Hyman was the pioneer in the field of systematics of the invertebrates.

→ The invertebrates are characterized by the absence of vertebral column (back bone) and presence of solid, ventral ganglionated nerve cord.

→ Libbie Henrietta Hyman (1888-1969)
L.H. Hyman is a very big name in ‘Invertebrate Zoology’. She was born of Jewish immigrants in Des Moines, Iowa. She majored in zoology and graduated in 1910 with a Bachelors of Science.
Hyman received her Ph. D. in 1915, when she was twenty-six years old, for a dissertation entitled, “An Analysis of the Process of Regeneration in Certain Microdrilous Oligochaetes.’’
She was made an honorary research associate of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, given an office, and although unsalaried, published the first volume of The Invertebrates in 1940.
Hyman’s recognition as an outstanding scholar began with publication of her first invertebrate volume. She subsequently received many honors and recognitions, including membership in the National Academy of Sciences. In addition to her many books and laboratory manuals, Hyman published 135 scientific papers.
“I now retire from the field, satisfied that / have accomplished my original purpose – to stimulate the study of invertebrates.”

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